Soak it up! Fall 2016 webinar series

Join all three webinars in this Fall 2016 to learn about green stormwater infrastructure in action!

Tickets to each webinar are $50. Register the entire series at $100 for all three webinars or any two for $75.

Transforming rainwater management on the Ontario landscape—the changing policy environment

Thursday October 13, 2016 1-2pm (EDT)

Presented by Anastasia Lintner, PhD, LLD, and Clifford Maynes, Executive Director of Green Communities Canada

Eventbrite - Soak it Up! Webinar Series Fall 2016

The Ontario government appears to be embracing a new paradigm for stormwater management using green infrastructure (low impact development) to reduce runoff and runoff pollution. Environmental lawyer Anastasia Lintner, and Clifford Maynes, Executive Director of Green Communities Canada will talk about two important processes under way now: the Coordinated Land Use Planning Review and the Low Impact Development Guidance Document (including runoff volume expectations). Anastasia and Clifford will outline provisions in these important policy initiatives, and talk about strengths, weaknesss, and opportunities for improvement.

Roads and runoff — using green infrastructure to manage stormwater runoff from roads and highways

Wednesday November 23, 2016 1-2pm (EDT)

Presented by Robert Goo, Office of Research and Development, USEPA

Eventbrite - Soak it Up! Webinar Series Fall 2016

There are over 900,000 km of roads in Canada, creating thousands of square kilometers of impervious surface which rain water washes over carrying pollutants into our waterways. Managing road runoff through rain gardens, bioswales, infiltration galleries or urban trees in the rights-of-way reduces runoff volumes and stormwater pollution. It can also make streets safer and more pleasant for pedestrians and cyclists, while sequestering carbon. Some cities (Toronto, Philadelphia, Boston) are now beginning to institutionalize this approach, through complete streets and green streets policies. Pilot projects which infiltrate stormwater runoff in rights-of-way have proven very successful. Costs have consistently been shown to be lower and performance has exceeded expectations. Join us to learn about what the US Environmental Protection Agency has done to enhance right of ways by using green stormwater infrastructure.

Green infrastructure on Cherry Ave., Tucson - Rincon Heights project site by Watershed Management Group

Photo credit: Watershed Management Group, Tucson.

Green infrastructure at Cherry Ave., Tucson (Rincon Heights neighborhood) in 2010—one of the many projects by Watershed Management Group.

Weathering the drought — using green stormwater infrastructure to manage the impact of dry seasons

This was concluded on Wednesday September 28, 2016

Presented by Catlow Shipek, Policy and Technical Director, Watershed Management Group

Green infrastructure is a tool for managing rainfall. So what if there isn’t any? Many Canadian cities have been experiencing the driest growing season on record, and climate change experts expect that these dry extremes will become the norm. We need to provide opportunities to capture rain for reuse and allow it to soak into the ground where it can recharge groundwater, so cities and agriculture can become more resilient to drought. Join us to hear about the great work that the Watershed Management Group (WMG) is doing in Tucson, Arizona—a place where drought is the norm. Hear how WMG is using community-based green stormwater infrastructure to capture water during the rainy season to help harvest rain water and recharge groundwater in order to mitigate the impacts of the dry seasons.

 

Past webinars

May 25, 2016: Stormwater Retention Credits — a fresh idea

Presented by:

Mattew Espie, Environmental Protection Specialist, Stormwater Management Division, Department of Energy & Environment (DOEE), Government of the District of Columbia. Matthew’s work focuses on financial incentive programs for green infrastructure practices that reduce stormwater runoff.

Abstract:

Washington, DC has developed an innovative way of promoting cost-effective action to reduce stormwater runoff volumes: stormwater retention credits (SRCs). Landowners who lack an affordable way to meet requirements for onsite rainwater management can purchase stormwater retention credits from others in the same watershed in order to meet part of their obligations. Each credit is equivalent to managing one gallon of runoff for a year. Landowners with absorbent properties have a financial incentive to invest in green infrastructure and sell their SRCs.

April 27, 2016: Strategies for implementing green stormwater infrastructure

Presented by:

Clifford Maynes, Executive Director, Green Communities Canada.

Abstract:

Green Communities Canada developed the Soak it Up! Toolkit recognizing that communities are on the front lines of stormwater impacts, costs, and solutions. Conventional grey infrastructure (storm drains and pipes) is costly and can’t keep up with the challenges of increased urbanization and climate change. Green infrastructure (also known as low impact development) will be a big part of an effective, affordable solution.

The Soak it Up! Toolkit is available for free download at www.raincommunitysolutions.ca/en/toolkit
The 50-page document outlines a wide range of practical strategies for municipalities and communities, including green streets and alleys, green parks, development standards, and stormwater user fees and incentives as a way of promoting action on private property. The toolkit was prepared by Clifford Maynes and Clara Blakelock at Green Communities Canada, with funding from the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

March 30, 2016: Managing rain where it falls in the Lake Simcoe watershed

Presented by:

Steve Auger, M.Sc., P.Eng., Stormwater Management Specialist, Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority (LSRCA)

Abstract:

With the right support, developers and municipalities can become champions for low impact development and managing rain where it falls. In this webinar, Steve Auger from the Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority (LSRCA) RainScaping Program shared the experiences in addressing stormwater runoff from new developments, as well as from existing built-up areas in the Lake Simcoe region. Participants learned how LSRCA:

  • has developed a model bylaw and stormwater management guidelines for adoption by municipalities
  • works closely with developers and consultants to help them implement low impact development (LID) stormwater management
  • is developing a retrofitting incentive program for construction of green infrastructure on industrial, institutional and commercial lands
  • tailors training and capacity building for landscaping staff as an important part of the strategy in retrofitting the existing urban landscape
October 28, 2015: Panel on stormwater user fees

Presented by:

Carl Yates, Halifax Water; Brianne Czypyha, City of Victoria; and, Todd Chapman, the City of Waterloo

Abstract:

Cities across Canada are adopting a new approach to pay for necessary stormwater upgrades, including green infrastructure. Stormwater user fees charge properties based on the amount of impervious surface they contain.
The webinar brought together three experts from Canadian municipalities, which have adopted a user-pay system for stormwater. The panelists discussed the structure of their programs, and the successes and challenges of implementing an impervious-area based charge for stormwater.

October 7, 2015: Using urban trees for stormwater management

Presented by:

Peter MacDonagh, Kestrel Design Group.

Abstract:

Urban trees are valuable for many reasons. But a recent study from TD economics put 66% of an urban tree’s annual value to its benefits for stormwater management. Trees, when properly planted and maintained, can absorb a significant portion of a city’s stormwater. Municipal policies can help ensure that cities get the most out of their urban trees.

In the webinar, the urban tree expert, Peter MacDonagha—a forerunner in the use of trees for stormwater management—presented his ground breaking work in policy development, research quantifying tree stormwater benefits, and techniques for maximizing tree stormwater benefits.

May 29, 2015: Where's the green in green infrastructure: identifying the direct and indirect benefits of low impact development

Presented by:

Phil James and Kyle Vander Linden, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC)

Abstract:

The webinar focused on understanding the economics of green infrastructure. Phil James and Kyle Vander Linden from Credit Valley Conservation identified the benefits of low impact development through a discussion of the returns on infrastructure investments.

May 22, 2015: Green infrastructure and flood resiliency

Presented by:

Dr. Robert Roseen, Horsley Witten Group.

Abstract:

The webinar explored sustainable and low-cost ways to reduce flood risk with green infrastructure.

May 8, 2015: Rain Ready: finding solutions to urban flooding

Presented by:

Harriet Festing, Director, Water Program, Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT), Chicogo.

Abstract:

The webinar presented how the RainReady program at CNT helped retrofitting communities at high risk of flooding.

April 24, 2015: Infiltration in low permeability soils: lessons from the Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program

Presented by:

Dean Young, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)

Abstract:

The webinar discussed how to make green stormwater infrastructure work on low permeability soils.

April 10, 2015: Philadelphia: Green City, Clean Waters

Presented by:

Tiffany Ledesma, Jessica Noon, and Amy Liu, Philadelphia Water Department.

Abstract:

Presenters shared the successes, challenges and opportunities for Philadelphia’s city-wide green infrastructure implementation.

March 13, 2015: Permeable pavements in Ontario: design options, BMPs, and proven performance

Presented by:

Dr. Jennifer Drake, University of Toronto.

 

January 30, 2015: Urban flooding in Canada

Presented by:

Dan Sandink, Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction (ICLR)

January 23, 2015: Implementing a stormwater utility and incentive program without getting soaked

Presented by:

Denise McGoldrick, City of Waterloo

Abstract:

The webinar presented the Kitchener-Waterloo story of how municipalities may finance and implement green infrastructure.

January 16, 2015: Monitoring results from LID across Canada

Presented by:

Chris Denich, Aquafor Beech.

Abstract:

Chris Denich presented how low impact development (such as permeable paving and rain gardens) perform in cold climates across Canada.

December 12, 2014: Engaging the community about stormwater management: the Kitchener-Waterloo experience

Presented by:

Cheryl Evans, REEP Green Solutions

Abstract:

The webinar showcased the Kitchener-Waterloo success story of city-wide implementation of stormwater rates, credits, and incentive program through intensive community engagement.

November 28, 2014: Legal responsibilities and risk management in a changing climate

Presented by:

Laura Zizzo, Zizzo Allan Professional

Abstract:

The webinar explored the need to reduce flooding from the perspectives of municipal liability issues.

October 31, 2014: The business case for change: the need for innovative stormwater solutions

Presented by:

Christine Zimmer and Phil James, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC)

Abstract:

The webinar presented lessons learned from the implementation of infiltration landscapes and other green storwmater features.